Holly | Fizzics Education

Holly

Holly

  • Education
  • |
  • Director
  • |

Holly

  • Education
  • |
  • Director
  • |

Apart from presenting engaging science lessons to children of all ages, Holly has presented fun science segments on national television and has even taught science using jumping castles and sumo suits at a State teaching conference! As a lead educator with Fizzics Education, Holly brings creative flair and talent to the design of science education events and lessons for learners of all ages.

Through Fizzics she’s designed and delivered science lessons for major institutions such as the Australian Museum, Powerhouse Museum, Hoyts Cinemas, the University of Western Sydney, NRMA, Sydney Olympic Park Authority and many more cultural organisations plus she’s presented science internationally via video conferencing and at SciFest Africa. She delivers teacher professional development sessions across the country and is a member of the Global Digital Literacy Council. In 2016 Holly won the Young Business Executive section of the Western Sydney Awards for Business Excellence and is the co-curator of TEDx Parramatta.

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Latest Post by Holly

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Fizzics Out and About

Holly Kershaw

We have been out and about celebrating National Science Week and having lots of fun with science in Sydney and beyond. We had an absolutely jam-packed National Science Week. – visiting many schools, and presenting at numerous events around the city, including Science in the...

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Science Lessons from Masterchef

Holly Kershaw

Who said that all reality television is complete rubbish? Sunday night’s Masterchef challenge contained some serious lessons about the importance of the scientific method. The challenge was to invent a recipe, and write it so that somebody following it to the letter could reproduce it...

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Does science always have to go bang?

Holly Kershaw

Most of the time when I walk into a job, whether it be a school workshop, an event, or a birthday party, I get asked if I’m going to make something explode – and I’m not sure that this is a good thing. As a...

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Rethinking ‘chemical-free’ products & the need for science communication

Holly Kershaw

I get irritated when I go shopping. More and more scientific jargon appears to be making its way onto the labels of products, and in many cases it is misused and doesn’t make sense. I’m a scientist, I use jargon all the time and I...

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Magical science

Holly Kershaw

I am not ashamed to admit this, but for the last 12 years of my life, I have wanted nothing more than to be able to toss some Floo powder in a fireplace and walk through that beautiful green flame to the land of Harry...

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Up, up and away!

Holly Kershaw

This is a significant weekend for science. At 1.25am AEST Saturday, Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to be launched into space for the 33rd and last time. As I was reading up on facts for a post about the final launch of Atlantis, I found...

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Well that was really, really close!

Holly Kershaw

Earlier this week, we had a close shave. An asteroid passed by the Earth at just 12,000 km. The distance between the Earth and the Moon is roughly 400,000 km. That is really, really close. The asteroid was between 5 and 20 km in diameter...

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Turtles Cause Airport Chaos!

Holly Kershaw

There is a large population of Terrapin Turtles living in the marshes near JFK Airport, and every year they migrate to nearby sandy areas in Jamaica Bay to lay their eggs – and there just happens to be a runway in the way. A runway...

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Volcanic Ash Chaos

Holly Kershaw

Chile’s Puyehue Volcano began to erupt on June 4 of this year, and despite being 10,000 km away from the eastern states, wreaked havoc on Australian and New Zealand air travel. How did the cloud of ash manage to travel so far? The answer is...

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Thinking about energy

Holly Kershaw

As part of our Renewable Energy workshop today, I was asked why we can’t use the steam produced by the evaporation of liquid nitrogen to power a turbine and generate electricity. The short answer is economics –the amount of energy that would be produced by...

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