Robo Wunderkind: early years robotics & blocks combined

Robo Wunderkind: early years robotics & blocks combined

Robo Wunderkind: early years robotics & blocks combined

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  • Robo Wunderkind robotics for kids
  • Building robots just got better

Delivering school STEM workshops across the country is such a rewarding job, especially when you get to hear from motivated primary teachers about the new edtech solutions they’ve come across! This week was one of these weeks where we heard about Robo Wunderkind, a combination of robotics and building blocks that are bound to grab kids attention!

  • Using Robo Wunderkind robotics in a primary classroom
  • Using Robo Wunderkind robotics in a primary classroom

Robotics in schools has come a long way since the clunky coding and fiddly bits of old (sure, these were fine for the older students but what about the younger ones?). With the Robo Wunderkind platform, students can quickly snap together coloured blocks containing the hardware needed and then connect to them via Bluetooth to your smart device.

  • Robo Wunderkind Play App in action
  • Robo Wunderkind Play App in action

The drag and drop code is quite intuitive for students in the early years to use and is in some ways reminiscent of the platform you might be familiar in code.org. Combined with the ability to connect to the classic LegoTM blocks we’ve come to love, the 14 different types of programmable blocks are likely to be a hit with your students.

The growth of edtech solutions for schools is relentless and in some ways it can be a challenge just to keep up! I’ll be attending ISTE 2017 this year in San Antonio and will be keen to meet up with some educators who can share ideas of how they are using early years robotics platforms such as Robo Wunderkind in their classroom. Should be fun!

Happy teaching,
Ben Newsome.

Learn how to code with the Fizzics team and our lego robots.

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