Fizzics TWIST Podcast with Fizzics Education - STEM news with a twist!

INSTANTLY BOOK LIVE INTERACTIVE ONLINE CLASSES NOW

FizzicsTwist

Coronavirus is here and it can be both scary and confusing. What even are viruses and what makes coronavirus different?

In this episode, we conduct an experiment about how viruses can be transmitted from person to person, and how you can prevent getting infected. This episode is curriculum-linked from Year 5 to Year 10 (see below)

Extra things!
Learn about how to model a pandemic using kitchen ingredients
Find out about how teachers are using distance education classes to help kids who are not able to get to school due to the virus.
Syllabus links

Year 5 

Living things have structural features and adaptations that help them to survive in their environment (ACSSU043 - Scootle )
Science involves testing predictions by gathering data and using evidence to develop explanations of events and phenomena and reflects historical and cultural contributions (ACSHE081 - Scootle )
Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE083 - Scootle )
Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS086 - Scootle )
Decide variables to be changed and measured in fair tests, and observe measure and record data with accuracy using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS087 - Scootle )
Reflect on and suggest improvements to scientific investigations (ACSIS091 - Scootle )

Year 6 

The growth and survival of living things are affected by physical conditions of their environment (ACSSU094 - Scootle )
Science involves testing predictions by gathering data and using evidence to develop explanations of events and phenomena and reflects historical and cultural contributions (ACSHE098 - Scootle )
Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE100 - Scootle )
Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS086 - Scootle )
Decide variables to be changed and measured in fair tests, and observe measure and record data with accuracy using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS087 - Scootle )
Reflect on and suggest improvements to scientific investigations (ACSIS091 - Scootle )

Year 7 

Classification helps organise the diverse group of organisms (ACSSU111 - Scootle )
Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available
Science knowledge can develop through collaboration across the disciplines of science and the contributions of people from a range of cultures (ACSHE223 - Scootle )
Identify questions and problems that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on scientific knowledge (ACSIS124 - Scootle )
Collaboratively and individually plan and conduct a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed (ACSIS125 - Scootle )
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS126 - Scootle )
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS131 - Scootle )
Use scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims based on evidence (ACSIS132 - Scootle )

Year 8 

Cells are the basic units of living things; they have specialised structures and functions (ACSSU149 - Scootle )
Multi-cellular organisms contain systems of organs carrying out specialised functions that enable them to survive and reproduce (ACSSU150 - Scootle )
Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE134 - Scootle )
Science knowledge can develop through collaboration across the disciplines of science and the contributions of people from a range of cultures (ACSHE226 - Scootle )
Identify questions and problems that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on scientific knowledge (ACSIS139 - Scootle )
Collaboratively and individually plan and conduct a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed (ACSIS140 - Scootle )
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS141 - Scootle )
Summarise data, from students’ own investigations and secondary sources, and use scientific understanding to identify relationships and draw conclusions based on evidence (ACSIS145 - Scootle )
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS146 - Scootle )
Use scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims based on evidence (ACSIS234 - Scootle )

Year 9 

Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to changes to their environment (ACSSU175 - Scootle )
Ecosystems consist of communities of interdependent organisms and abiotic components of the environment; matter and energy flow through these systems (ACSSU176 - Scootle )
Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS164 - Scootle )
Plan, select and use appropriate investigation types, including field work and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods (ACSIS165 - Scootle )
Analyse patterns and trends in data, including describing relationships between variables and identifying inconsistencies (ACSIS169 - Scootle )
Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS170 - Scootle )
Evaluate conclusions, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations, and describe specific ways to improve the quality of the data (ACSIS171 - Scootle )
Critically analyse the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems (ACSIS172 - Scootle )

Year 10 

Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS198 - Scootle )
Plan, select and use appropriate investigation types, including fieldwork and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods (ACSIS199 - Scootle )
Select and use appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to collect and record data systematically and accurately (ACSIS200 - Scootle )
Analyse patterns and trends in data, including describing relationships between variables and identifying inconsistencies (ACSIS203 - Scootle )
Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS204 - Scootle )
Evaluate conclusions, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations, and describe specific ways to improve the quality of the data (ACSIS205 - Scootle )
Critically analyse the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems (ACSIS206 - Scootle )

Fizzics TWIST is back! In this episode we're doing something a little different.

Nuclear power has a pretty bad reputation right now, but it might be the energy solution that we need. But wait - how does it work? How does nuclear science work? In this episode we visit ANSTO to learn about nuclear science and build our own cloud chamber (a basic particle detector) to see it in action for ourselves.

This episode is curriculum linked from Year 5 to Year 10:

Year 5
Science involves testing predictions by gathering data and using evidence to develop explanations of events and phenomena and reflects historical and cultural contributions (ACSHE081)
Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE083)
With guidance, pose clarifying questions and make predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS231)
Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS086)
Reflect on and suggest improvements to scientific investigations (ACSIS091)

Year 6
Science involves testing predictions by gathering data and using evidence to develop explanations of events and phenomena and reflects historical and cultural contributions (ACSHE098)
Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE100)
With guidance, pose clarifying questions and make predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS232)
Identify, plan and apply the elements of scientific investigations to answer questions and solve problems using equipment and materials safely and identifying potential risks (ACSIS103)
Reflect on and suggest improvements to scientific investigations (ACSIS108)

Year 7
Collaboratively and individually plan and conduct a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed (ACSIS125)
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS126)
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS131)
Use scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims based on evidence (ACSIS132)

Year 8
Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE134)
Science knowledge can develop through collaboration across the disciplines of science and the contributions of people from a range of cultures (ACSHE226)
Identify questions and problems that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on scientific knowledge (ACSIS139)
Collaboratively and individually plan and conduct a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed (ACSIS140)
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS141)
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS146)

Year 9
All matter is made of atoms that are composed of protons, neutrons and electrons; natural radioactivity arises from the decay of nuclei in atoms (ACSSU177)
Scientific understanding, including models and theories, is contestable and is refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (ACSHE157)
Advances in scientific understanding often rely on technological advances and are often linked to scientific discoveries (ACSHE158)
Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS164)
Evaluate conclusions, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations, and describe specific ways to improve the quality of the data (ACSIS171)

Year 10
Scientific understanding, including models and theories, is contestable and is refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (ACSHE191)
Advances in scientific understanding often rely on technological advances and are often linked to scientific discoveries (ACSHE192)
Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS198)
Evaluate conclusions, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations, and describe specific ways to improve the quality of the data (ACSIS205)

About Fizzics TWIST

This Week In Science & Technology, brought to you by the team at Fizzics Education! Fizzics Education is one of Australia's leading science outreach providers of interactive science workshops and shows. Each week we take a look back at the hottest yet coolest science stories. From the supersonic to the glacial, from down to earth to out of this world, and from the ancient world to the distant future, Fizzics TWIST has it covered. Hosted by Duncan Bell, Quill Darby, and the entire Fizzics team.

http://fizzics.com.au/

The first ever photo of a black hole has been released by the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration and while it’s an amazing feat it’s a bit hard to figure out what you’re looking at - Duncan looks past the event horizon to explain what’s going on.

Why the first all-female spacewalk never happened: The media went nuts recently about how a planned all-female spacewalk was canceled. It seems like patriarchy has reached even the ISS. But the truth is a little more complicated. 

Do you hear silent GIFs?: GIFs are silent moving images, but certain GIFs can have 'sounds' for some people. How? Ben takes us through the science. 

Even mosquitoes hate Skrillex: Skrillex is (in)famous for being a divisive musician. But it looks like mosquitoes are tipping the balance as new research has found that playing Skrillex to mosquitoes reduces both biting and 'copulation activity'

What’s on, Watson?: It’s the day of the equinox AND a super moon, giving us a Super Worm Equinox Moon. That was not a Dune reference - that’s what it’s really called. We take a look at what an equinox actually is, and how the super moon got its name.

On the Green with Quill: A new coral reef has been found off the coast of Italy. Let’s be honest, it’s not as good as the Great Barrier Reef, but fun to learn about anyway!

ViralGram: Not only does playing music to ageing cheese imbue it with a milder taste, but if you play it A Tribe Called Quest then it becomes award-winning. Just don’t play that wheel of cheese any 360! Ha!

Fact of the Week: Boil ‘em, mash ‘em, stick ‘em in a stew, eat them for 60 days straight...

Warning: This episode of Fizzics TWIST contains discussion of HIV/AIDS from 16:00 to 26:30. If you or the person you’re listening with don’t want to hear about this then we suggest skipping that section.

Far Out with Duncan: NASA have ‘sonified’ an image of space taken by the Hubble telescope. Is it eerie and terrifying or oddly pleasant? You be the judge.

On the Green with Quill: Quill is back to fire up about climate change - climate modelling has revealed that if global CO2 levels reach 1300 ppm then clouds start to break apart and this really lets the genie out of the bottle - with sizzling consequences.  

UnTwist: A second and possibly third person have been functionally cured of HIV. We untwist this story, explaining the mechanism and the future of HIV treatment using this method.

What’s on, Watson?: Just in time for Women’s History Month, the first spacewalk by an all-female team will take place on March 29.

Huge if True: How a supernova caused a mass extinction including a very fierce animal you might have seen at the movies!

ViralGram: Why do zebras have stripes? While they may look fly, it’s the flies they have to worry about! Read the article and see the pictures here: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/why-do-zebras-have-stripes-flies/583114/  

UnTwist: An amazing prehistoric discovery right here in Australia - and we’re very excited because our own staff have been involved. Anyone up for a road trip?

Fact of the Week: The human body can be pretty gross sometimes, but it can be even more gross in space...

What’s on?!: It’s the International Day of Women and Girls in Science AND International Women’s Day - Kate joins us to talk about some groundbreaking achievements by women made in 2018.

Far Out with Duncan: A little rover close to Duncan’s heart, the Opportunity Rover has been declared… dead. We discuss this somber moment.

ViralGram: Have you lost a USB stick recently? Been kayaking near seals recently? The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand would like to have a word with you! Listen to our previous story about seals in Episode 21.

Fact of the Week: An amazing revelation that brings both space and dinosaurs together in this positively titan fact.

ViralGram: A wayward seal has been photographed with an eel stuck up its nose. It turns out this is not the first time this has happened...

Huge if True: Mobile phones will be banned from primary schools across NSW from next year. Is this a good idea? 

Far Out with Duncan: The Mars InSight Lander has sent back audio from the surface of Mars. A sound from an alien world. Hear it in this segment! 

Fact of the Week: Quill brings some fun festive facts for this Christmas episode! 

ViralGram: Students around Australia have staged protests against inaction on climate change. We applaud their efforts! 

In the Lab with Quill: Researchers from the University of Queensland (strewth) have discovered a DNA signature of multiple types of cancer. What on Earth does that mean you ask? Quill applies her VLB (Very Large Brain) to the problem.

Far Out with Duncan: CIMON (pronounced 'Simon') is a cute space-robot with a dark and insecure past. Will he take over the ISS? Duncan explores.

Fact of the Week: Are you a Round-Earther? Well, we've got bad news for you...

UnTwist: A Chinese scientist claims to have modified the genes of twin girls. We break down the science behind this case and discuss the implications.

ViralGram: Knickers the cow is a massive unit... but why? The answer is simple. 

Far Out with Duncan: Duncan explores his favourite topic, Mars landers.

What Year Is It?: Everything that happened in late November in years gone by... it's a good one! 

UnTwist: In the future, all meat might be grown in a lab instead of taken from animals. Quill, who is a vegetarian and has a PhD in Hippietarianism, takes us through this high-steaks topic.

On the Green with Quill: It turns out that apart from being cute and cuddly little units, wombats also poop out cubes. Quill, who has a PhD in faecal cubeism, explains how this might impact all of the manufacturing industry, forever.

Far Out with Duncan: Boffins from MIT have a made a plane that flies silently, with no moving parts, using technology straight out of Star Trek. Duncan, who doesn't have a PhD, perfectly illustrates this amazing tech in extreme detail.

Fact Of The Week: The year was 2009. Presidents were respected, the economy was stimulated, and the sky was a deep, dark red. Quill takes us back.

Huge If True: How much does a kilogram weigh? No one seems to know! Watch this video about how the kilogram will be redefined. 

On the Green with Quill: The world’s oceans are being eaten up, but by what? Where is the water going?

Far Out with Duncan: Underneath an ancient glacier in Greenland, scientists have discovered something with cosmic origins. Check out the tectonic plate diving here.

Fact Of The Week: This week’s fact will boil your brain and give you brainfreeze at the same time.

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By using our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our Cookie Policy.

{"cart_token":"","hash":"","cart_data":""}